Swifts.

Yesterday was another cool and rainy day here in the northwest.  I tortured myself for two hours early in the morning looking for a godwit that never appeared.  In the afternoon the rain slowed a bit and I took the dogs over to Mason Wetlands to wander around.  From the overlook in the Mckinstry parking area I started watching the Vaux's Swifts that were flittering around with the swallows...


I don't usually pay much attention to the swifts beyond noting that they are around.  But as I was watching through my binoculars I became convinced I saw a bigger one, and therefore spent a long time trying to refind it and photograph it. 

In hindsight it may have just been a swift that flew closer to me than the others did.  But maybe, just maybe, it was actually a Black Swift?  From what I understand, these birds are possible at this time of year though definitely not common.  Anyway, I took a billion photos of every swift I could focus on.  I went through the photos last night and found one that almost looks like it has a notched tail, telling of a Black Swift. 


But wait, is that even a swift?  There's an excellent chance it is not.  Perhaps a martin?  Argh... Bird brain pain strikes again.  Good times?

Comments

  1. Cool seeing the Vauz's Swifts. I have only seen the Chimney Swifts around here. Sorry I can not help with your id, I am sure someone will be helping. Happy Birding, Jen!

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  2. FJ: that second bird is not a martin, nor is it a swallow. Doesn't look bad for Black Swift at all, though its a funny angle. The tail is telling.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks, dude. Glad to know I'm not insane (in regards to this bird of course).

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  3. I Hope it is a black Swift for you, I too only see the Chimney around here so seeing the Vaux's is a treat for me too!! Hope the rain leaves you now and you get some SUN, we finally had some rain last night, much needed.

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