Astoria & Fort Stevens State Park

Yesterday morning I got up early to head to Fort Stevens State Park in Warrenton, OR.  I was psyched that the weather was cooperative and the rain held off till early afternoon.

I stopped in Astoria first to take Jake for a walk along the river..


Looks like some Scaups (Lesser or Greater?!), females and a male.  Also, some female Buffleheads, and a pair of Mallards.

A Belted Kingfisher flew from post to post.




Of course I had to go see the sea lions.. I thought Jake would like to see them too.  He seemed kind of interested in what was making the crazy sounds so we walked up the pier.  He caught sight of one and still only seemed a little excited.  Then he smelled them.  Suddenly he was terrified and started pacing frantically while I tried to take some pictures.  Then he just started barking like crazy so we left.  No more sea lion visits for Jake.  This is the same dog who has no problem trying to herd a half dozen horses.  I suppose we've all got our fears.


After traumatizing Jake I drove to Fort Stevens State Park.
I know zilch about gulls.  I'll call this a pretty one.

Surf Scoters!

What cool birds...

I believe this is a Dunlin.

At Carruthers Park in Warrenton a lone Bald Eagle perched by the river.

Back in Astoria...
Are these Pelagic Cormorants? 

Thanks again to everyone who checks in on this blog!  I really appreciate all your help!


Comments

  1. I don't think those are cormorants in your last shot either; most likely, some kind of alcid (but I know next to nothing about this family of birds, so I can't say which one...)

    Very cool, though! And I LOVE the title of your blog!
    ; <)

    ReplyDelete
  2. I am not real familiar with the west coast cormorants, but I would say pelagic - size & profile. You're right about the Dunlin. I'm going to stay away from the gull - except one of the larger larids (Calf or Herring?) You had a good day.

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

Oregon's Finest: The Beach and the Gorge.

Mount St. Helens

New England Backyard Wildlife